Category Earth Science

Science 2.0

I’ve been thinking a bit about what I have loosely referred to as ‘climate terrorism’ – which chimes with what Paul Krugman has said recently: ‘Terrorism,’ he says, ‘can’t and won’t destroy our civilization, but global warming could and might.’ Yeah. And then there’s the term ‘climate delinquent,’ which Irish politician Eamon Ryan has been […]

The optimal route to visit every county in Ireland (by car and bike)

If you’ve ever wanted to visit every county in Ireland by car, while taking in one of the area’s major attractions, then look no further: I have calculated the optimal route to visit a major place of interest in every county on the island of Ireland. You can see the interactive version here. The map […]

The Irish Seafloor: Out of sight, out of mind?

The following is a guest post by Kieran Craven, a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Department of Geography who also now works at the Geological Survey of Ireland. It is said that we know more about the surface of the Moon, than we do about our own planet’s ocean floors.Globally, the ocean floor has been mapped […]

The Science of Christmas

Today’s Irish Independent carries a special supplement on the ‘Science of Christmas’.  Through a series of light-hearted seasonal questions, aspects of scientific study are packaged for a general audience. The supplement carries a piece by NUIM Geography’s Dr Stephen McCarron on the geology of Christmas or ‘How Santa’s reindeer may find their way home’.

Italian Earth scientists unfairly prosecuted for failure to ‘predict’ the unpredictable.

The decision by an Italian court to prosecute 6 Italian scientists for failure to ‘predict’ the L’Aquila earthquake in 2009 is a gross example of the misunderstanding of the processes governing earthquake occurrence.  Contrary to this prosecution’s apparent logic, earthquakes are fundamentally, or inherently unpredictable.   All available geological evidence indicates that their prediction in time […]

Recently completed PhD: Ciaran Broderick

We are delighted to note that Ciaran Broderick completed his PhD recently. His thesis was titled ‘Climate change and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): changes in flow and freshwater habitat in the Burrishoole catchment.’ Here is his abstract: Climate change is anticipated to impact the flow regime of riverine systems with resultant consequences for the freshwater […]

Follow the progress of the Celtic Explorer in the North Atlantic.

A research cruise onboard the Marine Institute’s Celtic Explorer vessel, which NUIM Geography Department staff member Steve McCarron was involved in planning, is currently collecting sediment cores from a number of locations on the Irish continental Shelf as part of the INFOMAR research programme . The cores (up to 6m length, collected in waters up […]