Tag Archives: electoral geography

Let’s Talk about Trump: Introduction to a Series of Blog Posts

On the morning of the 9th of November, when word was rapidly spreading that Donald Trump had been voted as the next U.S. President, The Department of Geography quickly organized an event entitled #LetsTalkAboutTrump. The event consisted of presentations from Geographers Adrian Kavanagh, Karen Till, and Claire McGing and promoted discussion among the audience of […]

Geography and Elections – Studying voter turnout levels at the 2015 Marriage Equality Referendum

Adrian Kavanagh, 15th September 2015 Some of you may be aware that I am mainly an electoral geographer. What makes me different from political scientists? Well my main focus in studying electoral trends and behaviour is on studying how trends and behaviours differ between areas, or places, and as a result my main unit of […]

Geography and Elections – Studying voter turnout levels at the 2013 Seanad Referendum

Adrian Kavanagh, 19th November 2013 Some of you may be aware that I am mainly an electoral geographer. What makes me different from political scientists? Well my main focus in studying electoral trends and behaviour is on studying how trends and behaviours differ between areas, or places, and as a result my main unit of […]

Geography and the coming general election

Adrian Kavanagh, 17 December 2010 With a general election expected to take place in Ireland sometime between the end of January and the middle of April, the first few months of 2011 should see most geographers – and not just the elections nerds like myself – taking a greater interest in all things electoral. It […]

The Geography of Women in Irish Politics

Women hold just 23 seats out of 166 in the current Dáil. Although a vast body of scholarship has looked at the factors attributable to the low numbers of women in Irish politics, few have considered the importance of geography in their analyses (exceptions include Randall and Smyth, 1987; Galligan, 1991; NWCI, 2003 and Galligan […]

Making The Red C Poll Geographical: How Poll Figures Might Apply At The Constituency Level

The Red C Poll, published in The Sunday Business Post on Sunday May 2nd suggests that support for Labour is now at a higher level than that of Fianna Fail, and suggests that, should a general election be held tomorrow, that Fianna Fail, the party who has won the largest number of votes and Dail seats […]

The politics of place: The upcoming UK general election

The Caledonian Mercury, an online Scottish newspaper, has put up a great piece by John Knox on the importance of geography to an understanding of the upcoming general election in the UK. Electoral geographers have long argued for a place-based approach to analysing electoral behaviour (something all two of us in this department have shown […]